Archaeologists Discover 5,000-Year-Old Massive Ancient City Known As ‘The Bronze Age New York’

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Archaeologists Discover 5,000-Year-Old Massive Ancient City Known As ‘The Bronze Age New York’

 

At first, Dina Shalem, an archeologist from the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA), didn’t believe that they could find a city from the Early Bronze Age, which was thousands of years ago -- not until they uncovered the 5,000-year-old city of En Esur, which they regard as the largest and the most important site from that era. 

 

Photo Credits: All That's Interesting

 

Dubbed as ‘The Bronze Age New York’, En Sur was one of the earliest cities known in the southern Levant. And, it is the largest so far since it was about ten times larger than Jericho. According to All That’s Interesting, a site for curious people who want to know more about what they see on the news or read in history books, the city has an impressive network of streets. These were covered by plaster and stone to prevent flooding. The people also used large silos for long-term food storage.

 

Photo Credits: All That's Interesting

 

The researchers stated that En Sur, which covers an area of 160 acres, was once home to an estimated 6,000 people. This is a substantial increase over the similarly unearthed towns of Megiddo and Jericho in southern Israel. They discovered millions of flint tools and fragments of pottery, a stone replica of a human head, animal figurines, and a seal depicting a man next to an animal. Aside from that, they also found several ancient objects and charred animal bones which are believed to have been used in sacrifices.

According to the IAA, the findings allow them to look beyond the material and into the spiritual life of the large community that lived at the site. “These surprising findings allow us, for the first time, to define the cultural characteristics of the inhabitants of this area in ancient times,” they said. 

 

Photo Credits: All That's Interesting

 

The site was uncovered through the help of 5,000 teenagers and volunteers. “This is a huge city — a megalopolis in relation to the Early Bronze Age, where thousands of inhabitants, who made their living from agriculture, lived and traded with different regions and even with different cultures and kingdoms in the area,” IAA’s Dr. Dina Yitzhak Paz said.

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2019.09.22

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