Incan ‘Princess’ Mummy Has Returned to Bolivia After Over 129 Years

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Incan ‘Princess’ Mummy Has Returned to Bolivia After Over 129 Years

 

In recent years, the Bolivian government has been trying to repatriate several archaeological artifacts, including those that were taken from the country illegally. One of the successful results of their efforts is the return of the mummified remains of an Incan ‘Princess’.

 

Photo Credit: All That's Interesting

 

The Incan Princess, who was named Ñusta, was discovered in the Andean mountains near La Paz. The archaeologists believe that the girl died during the second half of the 15th century, more than 500 years ago. What made the remains important is that it was found well-preserved. Its dress, which was made from llama or alpaca, has seemingly stood the test of time, while her braids are still intact. The researchers also believed that she came from an Aymara group known as the Pacajes and died when she was eight years old. 

 

Photo Credit: All That's Interesting

 

David Trigo, who heads the National Archaeology Museum in La Paz, believes that the mummy princess was an important member of a prominent clan because she was found in a stone tomb. Incas typically built such tombs, known as chullpa, for prominent members of their clans. Aside from that, her tomb was filled with worldly objects such as sandals, feather pouches, a clay jar, and some plants, including maize and coca. “It’s possible that the girl was an important person and that the objects placed with her had as much sacred importance as they had a useful purpose,” William A. Lovis, an emeritus professor of anthropology at Michigan State, said. 

 

Photo Credit: All That's Interesting

 

Since the well-preserved mummy was found, it has stayed at the Michigan State University Museum for 129 years. According to All That’s Interesting, a site for curious people who want to know more about what they see on the news or read in history books, the return of the Inca Princess to Bolivia marks the first time an archaeological artifact as significant as it is has been repatriated to the South American country.

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