Fears of ‘Curse of the Pharaohs’ Ignited After Ancient Egyptian Mummies Removed From Coffins

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Fears of ‘Curse of the Pharaohs’ Ignited After Ancient Egyptian Mummies Removed From Coffins

 

In 1886, Ancient Egyptian artisan Sennedjem was found buried in the workers' village of Set Maat alongside his family. His wife, Iyneferti, and more than 20 other relatives were also in the burial. Sennedjem was known as a skilled worker and Egyptian official who lived during the reigns of Seti I and Ramesses II of the 19th Dynasty, around 3,400 years ago. Aside from that, he was also known as a "Servant in the Place of Truth,” managing other workers building the tombs in the Valley of the Kings.

 

Photo Credit: The Sun

 

Since Sennedjem’s discovery, his mummified body had been displayed at the Egyptian Museum in Tahrir Square in Egypt. Recently, he and his wife were moved to the National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation where they will undergo intensive restoration. According to The Sun, a British national daily tabloid newspaper, the mummies will be restored before they can be displayed in a new exhibition hall. 

 

Photo Credit: The Sun

 

Sennedjem and Iyneferti will be placed in a sterilization chamber for over 20 days, where they will undergo a process that will rid their bodies of insects. However, the mummies were removed from their coffins, sparking ‘Curse of the Pharaohs’ fears. This alleged curse is said to cause bad luck, illness, or even death to anyone who disturbs the mummified remains of an Ancient Egyptian.

According to National Geographic, an American pay television network and flagship channel, the ‘Curse of the Pharaohs’ started when King Tutankhamun’s tomb was discovered in the Valley of the Kings in 1922. Within a decade, several people present when the tomb was opened and the expedition sponsor Lord Carnarvon died. 

 

Photo Credit: The Sun

 

However, late Egyptologist Dominic Montserrat conducted a comprehensive study that showed that the mummy's curse concept predates Carnarvon's Tutankhamen discovery and his death by a hundred years. According to Montserrat, the curse was created to pen tales of mummy revenge. "My research has not only confirmed that there is, of course, no ancient Egyptian origin of the mummy's curse concept but, more importantly, it also reveals that it didn't originate in the 1923 press publicity about the discovery of Tutankhamen's tomb either," he said. 

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