Man Almost Died After Being Licked By Pet Dog

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Man Almost Died After Being Licked By Pet Dog

 

49-year-old Greg Manteufel from Wisconsin, United States, almost died after he contracted capnocytophaga in June 2018, a germ found in the saliva of cats and dogs, explains Jimmy Nsubuga of the U.K.’s highest-circulating newspaper Metro. In general, the germ is harmless to humans unless they have a “weakened immune system.” Hence, it’s quite strange that Greg fell ill despite him being perfectly healthy. 

He had fever and diarrhea and even started vomiting, prompting his family to take him to the hospital. Greg thought he had the flu, but it was a lot worse than that. Doctors performed blood cultures and found capnocytophaga. The latter caused sepsis, a severe blood infection. Sepsis led Greg’s blood pressure to drop and his organs to shut down. He contracted the disease from Ellie, his dog. 

 

Photo Credit: AP (via Metro)

 

Given Greg's condition, doctors decided to amputate his “parts of his arms and legs,” the skin of his nose, and part of his upper lip. It is said that the doctors pushed through with the amputation after Greg told them to “do what you have to, to keep me alive.” His wife, Dawn, and 26-year-old son, Mike, stayed optimistic. 

Greg was released from the inpatient rehab unit in two weeks thanks to his positive mindset. Patients usually stay at the unit for a month, but medical director for the inpatient rehab unit at the Froedtert & the Medical College of Wisconsin Dr. David Del Toro remarks, “He does not seem like any other patient I’ve met before.”

 

Photo Credit: AP (via Metro)

 

Greg learned how to use his prosthetic arms and legs. He is now learning how to use a fork, pick up the TV remote, cut vegetables, do the dishes, and open doorknobs. Interestingly, researchers affiliated with Harvard Medical School have been studying cases similar to Greg’s 

They conducted genetic testing on five healthy individuals who contracted capnocytophaga “to see if they could find anything in common.” The researchers found that a genetic variant in the immune system makes a person more vulnerable to “developing medical problems” from capnocytophaga.

 

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