Jack Daniel Died Because He Kicked His Safe

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Jack Daniel Died Because He Kicked His Safe

 

We see his name at every bar we visit to have a good time. It’s arguably the most famous brand of whiskey out there and will probably be well into the future. 

Many things are known about Jack Daniel’s ascent as a favorite alcoholic beverage, but it’s also interesting how the person behind the alcohol died. In what is technically considered a freak accident, Daniel died of sepsis after he kicked a safe that promptly got his left foot wounded and then infected. 

As stated in an article by Amanda Macias for Business Insider Australia, a website offering news, trends, and other insights, Jasper Newton “Jack” Daniel started life pretty much on the run. At seven years old, the boy ran away from home “sometime in the 1850s.” 

 

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

 

The story goes that Daniel moved in with Dan Call, a reverend who had a whiskey business. People eventually started talking about Reverend Call, who was “working for God on Sunday and then making liquor on Monday.” Embarrassed that this had become his reputation, Call sold the business to Daniel for $25 to do as he saw fit.

Daniel proved to be up to the task, growing the whiskey business by himself.

 

Photo Credit: Business Insider

 

Several years later, Daniel came in early to “complete some paperwork.” He needed to open his safe but

couldn’t remember the combination, try as he might. In his frustration, he kicked the safe with his left foot. It would prove to be his biggest and fatal mistake. His big toe got infected and he had to have his foot amputated, but the gangrene “continued to spread throughout his system and he eventually lost his left leg due to poor blood circulation.” 

On October 9, 1911, he would die at the age of 61 due to complications from the gangrene infection. 

 

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