Unbelievable Ways People Have Died

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Unbelievable Ways People Have Died

 

All living things have one thing in common: they die. It’s a sad but inevitable part of life. The only difference is how death comes. People die due to diseases, some to accidents, while others to unexplainable circumstances. Our history has seen some of the most bizarre things happening to people, and these include dying in the most unusual way. Some cases are extremely strange that it’s hard to believe they really happened.

 

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

Death by Dancing

Dancing is supposed to be fun and harmless, but as it turned out, it can also kill people. In July 1518, residents of Strasbourg, a city in northeastern France, were struck by a sudden and seemingly uncontrollable urge to dance. The nonstop dancing started with Frau Troffea when she was cutting a rug in the middle of the street. She was later on joined by 34 people. By August, their number had increased to 400. The nonstop dancing ultimately led to the death of many people. In a day, an average of 15 people would collapse from a heart attack, exhaustion, or stroke. This event is now known as the Dancing Plague of 1518 and experts still have no idea what triggered the whole thing.

 

Photo Credit: All That's Interesting

 

Spontaneous Human Combustion

On July 2, 1951, the body of Mary Reeser, 67, was discovered in her apartment by the police, and it was nearly cremated. According to All That’s Interesting, a site for curious people who want to know more about what they saw on the news or read in history books, the only pieces left of her were her skull, spine, and one of her feet. The case extremely puzzled the investigators since her apartment was relatively free of fire damage. A stack of newspapers near her was untouched by the flames.

 

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

Extreme Laughing

They say that laughter is the best medicine. While this is true for many people, it ended the life of Thomas Urquhart, a Scottish aristocrat and author. He was known to have served both King Charles I and Charles II before being imprisoned in the Tower of London. Eventually, Urquhart was exiled to Europe. According to reports, the Scottish aristocrat died due to “excessive laughter” after finding out that Charles II had been restored to the throne in 1660. In cases like this, it is believed that extreme laughing caused either asphyxiation or heart failure.

 

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

Tripping on a Beard

It is an unlikely scenario to die due to facial hair. But this is exactly what happened to Hans Steininger, a Renaissance-era Bavarian, when he fell victim to his famous flowing beard. According to an article by Bustle, an online American women's magazine, Steininger commonly kept his six-feet-long beard rolled up and stored in a leather pouch. One day, a fire ignited in their town. Since his beard wasn't tucked away during that time, he tripped on it. It was believed that he either failed to escape the fire or broke his neck.

 

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

Strangled by an Automobile

Isadora Duncan, a dancer during the early 20th century, had experienced several automobile accidents throughout her career. For instance, in 1913, a car driven by her nanny plunged into the Seine River near Paris, killing both of her children. Another a car accident also caused her death but in an unusual way. It was reported that her long, glamorous, trailing scarf got caught in the automobile’s wheel. She was wrenched from the moving vehicle by the trapped scarf and thrown to the ground, which broke her neck. 

 

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

 

Trying to Achieve Immortality

Throughout the years, many people have tried to escape death. One of them was Alexander Bogdanov, a founder of the Bolshevik Party in Russia. His career revolved around studying a wide range of subjects, such as philosophy, economics, medicine, and many more. Bogdanov was particularly interested in blood transfusions because he believed that it could rejuvenate humans, extend their lives, and possibly even make them immortal. He performed several transfusions on himself to achieve his goal. However, he made a huge mistake that caused his death. He unknowingly swapped his blood with a physics student who had been exposed to both tuberculosis and malaria.

 

Photo Credit: Max Pixel

 

Self-decapitation

In 2008, David Phyall’s Bishopstoke apartment building was set for demolition. However, he refused to follow the orders of the authorities to relocate and set out to show the injustice of it by committing suicide, but not in the usual way, such as by gunshot or poison or hanging. He tied a chainsaw to the leg of a snooker table, plugged it into a timer, and then lay down so his neck would be cut once the tool activated. Suffice it to say that his setup proved to be a success.

 

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