Skeleton Lake Reveals Details About the Mystery of the Bones There

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Skeleton Lake Reveals Details About the Mystery of the Bones There

 

The Roopkund Lake, also known as the “Skeleton Lake,” is found in the Indian Himalayas. It is popular among researchers because it is one of the most mysterious landmarks on the planet. 

People.com, a website that provides news about celebrity and human-interest stories, mentioned in an article that the lake is located over three miles above sea level. It is the home of hundreds of skeletons with some flesh still attached to several of them. Scientists believed that the skeletons buried in this 135-foot area died due to a single catastrophic event that happened 1,000 years ago. 

 

Photo Credits: Shutterstock

 

However, a recent study conducted by scientists in India, America, and Germany has disputed this theory. The research published by Nature Communications mentioned that after the scientists examined the DNA obtained from 38 of the skeletons they found out that owners of the bones did not die all at once. Instead, the infamous Skeleton Lake is a place where the dead were dumped numerous times. 

The researchers also found out that the DNA from dozens of the skeletal remains found in the lake revealed 23 males and 15 females. There were also two more genetic groups that appeared in the lake between the 17th and 20th centuries. However, the researchers failed to identify the cause of death of the individuals, but they hypothesized that it may be due to the high altitude of the area. 

 

Photo Credits: Shutterstock

 

“It’s hard to believe that each individual died in exactly the same way,” Eadaoin Harney, a doctoral student at Harvard and the lead author of the study, mentioned in an interview. The study also pointed out that none of the remains were related to another but instead showed a diverse group of people from different ages and populations. Even the chemical signatures found on the skeletons proved that they had diverse diets as well. 

 

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