2,100-Year-Old 'iPhone' Found Deep in Young Woman's Grave

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2,100-Year-Old 'iPhone' Found Deep in Young Woman's Grave

 

The first iPhone was not launched until 2007. But archaeologists recently discovered a 2,137-year-old ‘iPhone’ after digging a young woman’s grave. It was found after Russia’s biggest power plant, Ala-Tey necropolis, was drained. It is a giant reservoir in the mountainous Russian Republic of Tuva which is also known as a popular destination. 

Unilad, a British Internet media company and website owned by LADbible Group, reported that the rectangular-shaped object, which resembles an iPhone, belonged to an ancient fashionista. The archaeologists called her “Natasha” who was believed to live in the Xiongnu period in ancient Mongolia during the 3rd century BCE. The object was encrusted with precious stones and jewels and is made out of black gemstone jet. Anyone who could see it could easily mistake the object for a high-end phone case.

Photo via East2West News

 

The archaeologists found turquoise, carnelian and mother-of-pearl stones in the object. They believed that Natasha used this to wear as a belt buckle. In an interview, archeologist Dr. Pavel Leus said, “Natasha’s’ burial with a Hunnu-era (Xiongnu) iPhone remains one of the most interesting at this burial site. Hers was the only belt decorated with Chinese wu zhu coins which helped us to date it.” According to an article by Mirror, a British online site, the object which is slightly bigger than the average iPhone at seven by three and a half inches has Chinese wu zhu coins that helped archaeologists to date it. 

Photo via East2West News

 

Dr. Marina Kilunovskaya from the St. Petersburg Institute of Material History Culture stated that the site where the ‘iPhone’ was found is a scientific sensation. This is because they have unearthed two more partly-mummified prehistoric fashionistas earlier this year. The first one was nicknamed “Sleeping Beauty” who is believed to be a leather designer while the other one was a weaver laid to rest with her wooden spindle packed inside a sewing bag. “We are incredibly lucky to have found these burials of rich Hun nomads that were not disturbed by (ancient) grave robbers,” she said. 

 

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